Advanced Scene Study Intensive

Advanced Scene Study Intensive

Learn how you can nurture the skills needed to create grounded scenes that can sustain themselves for longer than just a few minutes.  In this two day intensive, we will focus on breaking out of any habits you may have formed that can hinder sustainable work, while we explore the small steps we can make to do truly sustainable, dynamic scenes.

 

  • Amanda’s Advanced Scene Study Class is not just the best improv class I’ve taken, it’s the best performance class I’ve taken in general. She is incredibly specific with her instruction, pushing and pulling at each performer where they need it. At the end of each class, I walked away feeling challenged. At the end of the session, I walked away a stronger improviser and actor.

    —Cody S.

Relationship Before Words

Relationship Before Words

In this workshop, improvisers will learn how to easily establish relationships on stage before dialogue even begins.  Integrating the use of space, physicality, object work and emotional reactions, this class helps put the “theatre” back into “improvised theatre,” creating the foundation for more engaging, sustainable scenework.

This workshop is pay-what-you-can ($40 suggested).

 

  • Amanda has so much skill, talent and super duper cool awesome energy, and I am really grateful I took this workshop.

    —Cathrin

Not At All Human

Not At All Human

From gods to gremlins; parakeets to pencils, when improvisers try to play characters so wholly unrelated to themselves, they can get stuck.  It can sometimes be difficult to fully commit to an unfamiliar reality, which can cause abandoned ideas and flailing scenes.  In this workshop, players will exercise both the physical and not-so-physical skills it takes to sustainably play non-human characters, opening up new worlds for scenes and longer narratives.

This workshop is pay-what-you-can ($40 suggested).

 

  • Amanda’s ‘Not At All Human’ class provides tips and techniques to help improvisers create nonhuman characters that not only reflect the physical features of the character, but also their personality, point of view, and objects of their desire.  There are exercises which help the student get grounded in the different body type (e.g., where is the new center of gravity, how does it feel to have wings or a tail, how do the sedentary natures of rocks and trees differ).  There are also exercises that focus on what makes a nonhuman character tick.  …While there is lots to learn, Amanda focuses on the fun.  There isn’t much point of playing a ‘fantastical fungus with sensual spores’ if you’re not having fun.  So, come for the instruction, stay for the fun, and then look for reasons to bring nonhuman characters to your improv play.

    —Gil